Ballard Naturopathic Blog | All posts tagged 'balance'

Stone Turtle HealthNaturopathic Medicine and Massage Therapy for the Whole Family

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Stone Turtle Health Blog

Band of Brothers (and Sisters)

September 29, 2013

I'm a big fan of Kid President. This kid stands for positive change, "being awesome" and "more dance parties". His partnership with local actor Rainn Wilson, of "The Office" and Soul Pancake is a bright light in an often-cynical and sad world I think the message that they are sharing is important. I LOVE dance parties! I want to be awesome!

Last month, I did an awesome thing. Via Twitter, I thanked Anthony Shears, a local recording artist living in L.A., for a beautiful song he had written about domestic violence. He did an awesome thing- he replied. Our dialogue, such as it was, transferred from Twitter to Facebook, to phone & email. We dreamed about what we could do to REALLY make a positive change in the lives of children touched by domestic violence or in difficult home situations. Anthony spent a lot of his childhood at the Ballard Boys & Girls Club. He tells me there were some days where most of his meals came from there. The folks at the Ballard Boys & Girls Club helped keep Anthony, his brother and their friends off the streets by providing them a safe place where they could build healthy relationships and stay out of trouble. Mentors at the Club gave the boys opportunites to play sports and support to succeed in school. Anthony went on to attend Dartmouth and work in L.A. with some legendary recording artists; Norris is an Olympic athlete. They want to give back.

My own work with children spans 20 years, in various areas such as medicine, social work, teaching, and volunteering. I believe that if we support children who need it the most, we benefit ourselves through building a strong community. Another generation will be raised up with the values that we treasure. Values like integrity, honesty, a strong work ethic, creativity, and a sense of community are supported at Boys & Girls Clubs. 

Working with Anthony, Norris, and a team of amazing volunteers, we are designing the first annual "Field of Our Dreams Celebrity Softball Tournament" to benefit the Ballard & Wallingford Boys & Girls Clubs. Money raised will help to re-surface the softball field and provide scholarship funds to the 70% of children that rely on assistance to be a part of the Clubs. Scheduled for May 4 at B.F. Day Playfield, the softball game will have local celebrities and athletes and live performances. This event can't happen without volunteers- let us know if you'd like to help!

Our first step: The upcoming Ballard Boys & Girls Club Auction to begin the fundraising for the field, held October 25th at 5:30 with both silent and live auctions. More information can be found here, as well as tickets ($45, including free childcare and a salmon dinner)

Challah back girl!

August 25, 2013

Here is a nice, nourishing recipe for a nice family Sunday brunch, using local ingredients. I love locally-made Essential Baking Company breads

Essential Baking Company Challah- sliced to 1 1/2 inch thickness

2-4 local cage-free eggs

1-2 tbsp of organic cows milk or almond milk

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1/4-1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice

1 stick of butter

Combine eggs and milk (1/2 tbsp milk to each egg). Whisk until fully combined. Add spices. Pour into flat dish or plate.

In frying pan, melt 1 tbsp of butter for each slice of bread.

Dip slices of challah in egg mixture (both sides). 

Add bread to frying pan, allow to saute in butter until toasted, then flip and toast on the other side.

Serve with syrup (I love a gift that I got- Brandy Infused Vanilla-Hickory Syrup) or jam (homemade blueberry jam is my current go-to for my jam needs). 

Tricks for Safe Treats

October 18, 2011

Little ghosts and goblins are excitedly gearing up for Halloween in less than 2 weeks. We all remember how fun it was to dress up and rampage through the neighborhood, collecting candy and playing tricks. Some of us had the best houses mapped out or even descended on housing developments from our country neighborhoods to maximize our candy-collecting efficiency. From Madonnas to monks, clowns to crickets, witches to Wonder Women, many of us have fond memories of costumes that we wore year in, year out. 

This year, make sure that your kids are safe by following these rules from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

S- Swords and knives (and other blades) should be soft and flexible

A- Avoid being alone. Kids should be accompanied by an adult. If you feel your kids are old enough to go on their own, make sure they're in a group & check in frequently via cell phone or coming home every hour.

F- Fasten reflective tape. If your child will be trick-or-treating after dark, pick up some inexpensive reflective tape and attach it to their costume so drivers can see them better.

E- Examine all treats! Make sure everyone gets a filling dinner before going outside, so that kids are less likely to be tempted to eat candy before you have checked it out. Look at each piece of candy for evidence of tampering with the wrapper. Do not accept homemade candy from people unless you know them well.

 

One of the best websites for child (and adult) Halloween safety tips, www.halloween-safety.com, offers more in-depth advice, such as not going into strangers' houses, making sure that costumes are flame-retardant and do not inhibit vision or movement, fire safety with candles and jack-o-lanterns, and pet safety tips. It is a great resource for parents and I highly recommend it!

 

Take a Time Out!

October 13, 2011

Lions, and Tigers and Bears, oh my! It's time for touchdowns, tackles, and tight ends. Whether you're watching your kids play, watching the pros, or playing the weekend warrior playing a pickup game on the front lawn or in the park, fall means football (and soccer) for a lot of people here in Seattle and across the US. Here are a few ways to add some healthy habits to your season!

Stretch! Get all those muscles nice and warm. Stretch your large muscle groups (upper legs- front AND back, calves, biceps & triceps, back muscles and neck muscles) to improve circulation and prevent injuries. Sitting on the couch through a Sunday's-worth of games can take a toll. Get up and move around, grab another glass of water, and keep moving. If you or your kids are on the field, warming up before the game is a MUST to avoid Monday remorse. 

Snack! Healthy snacks, like carrot sticks, orange slices, and peanut butter with crackers are perennial favorites for teams. At home? Add a twist to plain old chips and salsa by making a mix of shredded cabbage, diced tomatoes, onions, garlic and jalapenos to serve alongside. Buy the baked chips this time. Fruit plates, veggie trays with healthy dips like hummus, and chicken skewers instead of ribs and burgers are all great options that are lower in fat and calories. Chili is great, but skip the sour cream and mountains of shredded cheese & bacon bits.*

Drink! Water, that is. The more well-hydrated you are, the less sore you're going to be. Water helps remove waste products from active muscles, making for a more pleasant morning after the big game. Make sure to replace your electrolytes, such as sodium and potassium, which are lost when you sweat and can't be replaced by plain water. Healthy options, such as Recharge or Emergen-C are good alternatives to Gatorade and other electrolyte replacement drinks that use artificial ingredients.

Let's be realistic. Lots of folks like a beer while they watch the game. If you're going to drink alcohol, make sure you have a designated driver. Alternate each alcoholic drink with a large glass of water to avoid over-consumption (by filling up with water, you'll be less inclined to drink more alcohol to satisfy your thirst mechanism, and a stomach full of water will also help to stop you from eating the whole bag of chips by yourself). Know your limits. No one likes to deal with drunks at public sporting events or bars, so be aware of how much you're drinking. 

Have fun! Parents, remember that your kids are playing sports to have fun! Overcompetitive parents and those who argue with the referees, coaches, or other attendees are no fun for anyone. If you're playing, go with a laid-back approach. You're there to have fun, get some exercise, and spend time with your friends and teammates. Enjoy!

Remember Stone Turtle Health for school sports physicals (only $40 or insurance), therapeutic massage for sports injuries, and prevention.

*(Check back tomorrow for fall recipes that are great for entertaining during or after the game.)

 

Healthy Love

August 2, 2009

One of the factors that determines how well we cope with stress is the extent and connection of our support system. Family, friends, co-workers,mentors, and health professionals (spiritual, mental, and physical) all provide the assistance we need to deal with life's daily upsets as well as with major traumatic events and personal grief. The level to which we unburden ourselves on others can become unhealthy if taken to either extreme. While relying too much on the web of caring indivudlas who make up our community can leave us unpracticed in making our own decisions, feeling insecure, or out of control of our own lives, not taking the time to confide in another person puts us at greater risk for mental and physical health concerns, a sense of isolation, and limits our ability to truly develop sympathetic relationships with others. Finding a true balance will allow us to gain strength from those who hold our best interests at heart, who may be able to approach our own volatile emotional situations more dispassionately and provide us with much-needed objectivity. The best support comes from relationships that allow individuals the opportunity to make their own decisions but honestly reflect back the consequences of those decisions, for good or ill.

As a member of someone else' s support network, it can be challenging to provide love and support without judging, without overstepping boundaries in an attempt to help and without taking their problems on yourself or seeing them through the filters of your own subjective experiences. In many ways, though, having an opinion or a past experience that colors your interactions can be a positive thing, if you are able to frame your conversations in a way that best benefits the person seeking your advice and you don't get caught up in your own issues. Bringing a calm, nonjudgemental but differing viewpoint to the table can offer wonderful insights to the person struggling with the problem. In the end, everyone has to make their own decisions, in their own time. Just as you could not force someone to take care of themselves physically, you also can not force them to take care of their heart and soul, no matter how pure your intentions. The best you can do is to provide the support and unconditional love that will help them make the deicions that are right for them as you maintain a healthy distance that is right for you.

Seeking balance is never easy and there are many opportunities to fall out of equilibrium, many issues of our own that we deal with when watching a loved one. However, the perpetual exercise of returning to center ourselves strengthens our ability to take care of those around us when they need us most.

Balance

June 10, 2009

In my recent Ballard News-Tribune post on work-life balance, I offered a few suggestions to help weed out the unimportant things in life, to reconnect with your family, and to find time for yourself. Unfortunately, this had to be done in a 500-word format. The usual stuff, make lists, learn to say no, spend time doing meaningful stuff, cut down on TV.
In looking at my own life over the past weekend, I feel satisfied. I spent time working (I work Saturdays), playing with friends, and spending time alone (and I only spent $30 the whole weekend!) . I would say one of the hardest things for me, though, is to find this moderation in my daily life...Continue Reading Post Here