Ballard Naturopathic Blog | All posts tagged 'healing'

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Dance moves

May 24, 2013

 

Music, for one reason or another, has always been an integral part of my daily life. I meet people who can have music in the background at dinner or a barbecue, but how can you focus on anything without reveling in the songs, the lyrics and melodies changing you into whoever you were, wherever you heard that song for the first time?

Odd, this, but every few months or so, I'll just cling to some music, one particular artist or one song covered by many, as I use it to process whatever is happening in my life. Last spring, I was drawn to Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah". Life was not good. Love was not good. Love ended in brokenness.  Suffice to say, I survived and that song (although on repeat for a few, wallowing months) stopped being so personal. I was bright and shiny and life was beautiful again. Showtunes, old school R&B, anything that was sunshine and hope and the rush from dancing at home on my lunch break or after work, became preferred again.

What I've been feeling lately is spring and summer and hip-shaking solo dance parties. I've been moving through the world, walking for miles on my lunch break. The only trouble is trying to keep from dancing in the streets to the beats in my ears.  Right now, I'm grooving to "Fugees Radio" on Pandora, which I've filled with my own personal blend of 80's & 90's rap & hip-hop (memories from middle school through college) and today's new discoveries. For a few songs, I'm no longer staring 40 (well, ok, 36) in its exhausted eyes, I'm back in middle school, before the self consciousness, before any aches and pains, when we all danced in tight circles in the gym, trying to pick up new moves.

Which brings me to Macklemore & Ryan Lewis's "The Heist", only the second album I've purchased on my iPhone (the other being Johnny Cash's "Unchained", if you must get all the details of my "diverse" music tastes). There's that resonance again. I will warn you that there's cursing, so it's not something to spring on your kids without listening first. But, as an adult, I would definitely recommend you give it a listen. Listen to the words...

"My, Oh, My" makes me tear up at the loss of Dave Niehaus a few years back, remembering how I couldn't get my mom to get out of the car and come in for dinner until the M's game she'd been listening to all the way home from work was over. "Can't Hold Us" had me freak out,  dancing with a classmate in my improv class, "Thrift Shop" has its own dance routine worked out at home (with or without my vacuum cleaner),  "Victory Lap" and "Ten Thousand Hours", about the journeyman process to getting good at what you are passionate about rings true for me every day I step in my clinic, especially those times when I wonder what the heck I'm doing and when I should know enough to give up and let it crumble versus buckling down and riding out the rough spots. "Same Love" is thrilling to me now that marriage equality is a reality in our state, in so many other states and countries. How principled, how upright to stand up for this belief in equality in a genre that routinely diminishes and demonizes those who love people of the same gender, especially before it was the law to allow everyone the freedom to marry. I am so happy that all my friends, gay or straight, can choose to live the way they want to live with the partners that they love. 

But, oh, the heartbreak on "Starting Over", his follow up to "Otherside" makes me cry every time. I want to punch a hole in something when I think about addiction and the people I love that struggle with it. I hate that these are the stories that pretty much everyone has, that there's a saboteur in so many brains.. that this disease called addiction waits patiently for so many people to have a moment of weakness. The closing line is exactly what I want to hear: "If I can be an example of getting sober, then I can be an example of starting over..."

Macklemore's willingness to share his own struggles, his openness about what he's gone through and about his beliefs, and his positive attitude as reflected in his work are all inspiring to me. I became a doctor to make a difference in someone's life, to provide caring and healing for the people in my community who need it, to help build a stronger Seattle, a stronger and better world. He's made such a name for himself as an independent artist- that, too, I admire. The hard work and heartbreak, the two steps forward, one step back process of getting recognition, especially without the backing of a large corporation. If I could say anything to him, it would be "Well done. Keep making a positive change. Share your message with as many people as possible. You are a force for good. You matter and you have a chance to change so much. Keep moving. " I realize as I write this, these are the words we should say to everyone.

So, I guess this post is just a mash note to Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, but it's also for everyone I see making a choice every day to make a positive difference in the world, to reach out and connect with people around them, to stand up for the changes they want to see happen. Yeah, "The Heist" hits me. It's beautiful. You should listen to it. And you should dance.

 

Supplements

March 5, 2010

Today, I was given a link (via a FB friend and colleague) to what was termed "a visual representation of the research done on supplements". It's very pretty and interactive (you can click on a tab to gauge the benefits of a supplement as related to a specific category of illness). The link is here: http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/2010/snakeoil-scientific-evidence-for-health-supplements/

It's an interesting site, not just because of the visual qualities, but because they use interesting parameters to affect the size of the "balloons", each depicting a different supplement. The higher up the page, the more "large, human, randomized, placebo-controlled trials" were found in searches of two top search engines, PubMed and Cochrane. The size of the balloon reflects the number of Google hits for a supplement. I'm not entirely sure of the relevance of this, myself, since anytime a supplement comes into fashion, the number of websites and Google searches will correspondingly shoot up.

I look forward to seeing this specific illustration grow and change as the authors find more studies to validate or invalidate health claims made by people on both sides of the supplement argument. I would posit that, while many herbs, vitamins, and minerals have not been included because they have not been the focus of these large studies, there is something to be said for an herb with a 3000-plus year tradition of being used for a certain condition. This is termed "empirical evidence" (as opposed to evidence found using the scientific theory of forming a hypothesis, eliminating variables and testing the hypothesis) by people supporting a specific issue and "anecdotal evidence" by those opposing it. As humans, we have a wonderful capacity for assigning value to an object through spin, or, as I like to call it, creative wordsmithing.

For my practice, I will continue to suggest treatments that I've seen work, have been educated to understand why they work (what effect they have on the body physiologically), and have seen research on that is compelling enough for me to feel comfortable prescribing to my patients. Many, many of the treatments I use fall outside of the scope of this link and it's graphical representation, but I feel that they have a good grasp on the need to protect consumers from false health claims and a strong commitment to recommending demonstrably useful supplements. It's a great start to educating the public.

 

Balance

June 10, 2009

In my recent Ballard News-Tribune post on work-life balance, I offered a few suggestions to help weed out the unimportant things in life, to reconnect with your family, and to find time for yourself. Unfortunately, this had to be done in a 500-word format. The usual stuff, make lists, learn to say no, spend time doing meaningful stuff, cut down on TV.
In looking at my own life over the past weekend, I feel satisfied. I spent time working (I work Saturdays), playing with friends, and spending time alone (and I only spent $30 the whole weekend!) . I would say one of the hardest things for me, though, is to find this moderation in my daily life...Continue Reading Post Here