Ballard Naturopathic Blog | food

Stone Turtle HealthNaturopathic Medicine and Massage Therapy for the Whole Family

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Stone Turtle Health Blog

Spring? Summer? Food!!

May 2, 2014

Wow! 80+ degrees outside, 2 days in a row and it's not even August! Here are some great, simple recipes to keep you out of the kitchen and cooled down.

Dijon-marinated Root Vegetables

2-3 large carrots, peeled and cut into 2-3 inch sticks (about the size of a finger)

2 medium parsnips, peeled and cut into 2-3 inch sticks

1 medium onion (Walla Wallas are best), cut into wedges and separated

2-3 med potatoes, scrubbed, peeled and chopped into quarter-sized pieces

-        Cover all vegetables with olive oil and spread into a single layer on 1-2 baking sheets. Roast at 350, turning once with a spatula, until tender, approximately 20-25 minutes. Transfer to bowl and cool to room temperature

Honey-Dijon Marinade:

1 ½ c of olive oil

½ c Dijon mustard or whole grain brown mustard

¼ c. honey

1 tsp minced garlic or garlic paste

Salt & pepper, to taste.

 

-        Combine dressing ingredients in bowl or using blender to fully blend. Pour over root vegetables. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and store in refrigerator. Serve chilled.

 

Cold Noodle Salad with Beef or Shrimp

½ package whole wheat spaghetti or soba noodles, prepared and tossed with small amount of olive oil

1 lb shrimp, peeled, deveined, and cooked OR 1 lb of steak, marinated in olive oil & garlic, broiled & thinly sliced- chilled

Rice Wine Vinegar- 1 1/2 c

Sweet Chili sauce- ½ c

1-2 cloves of garlic, minced

½ red onion, thinly sliced and finely minced

¼ c roughly chopped cilantro or basil

½ head iceberg lettuce, chopped

Tomato wedges, as desired

 

-Combine vinegar, sweet chili sauce, garlic and minced onion. Combine remaining ingredients (may need to make more dressing if using steak instead of shrimp, as it soaks up more dressing). Top with dressing and chill. Serve cold. 

 

Homemade Ranch Dressing

A great way to get more veggies!

1 cup mayonnaise

2 cups plain Greek yogurt

1 tsp onion powder

1 tsp garlic powder

½ tsp salt

1 tbsp finely chopped fresh chives

 

Blend all ingredients. Chill, serve as garnish for carrot and celery sticks, cucumber slices, and radishes, or as salad dressing (may want to thin with milk if using as dressing).

 

Grain Salad with Shrimp, Feta, and Pine Nuts

1 c. brown rice or pearled barley.

½ lb shrimp, peeled, deveined, cooked and roughly chopped

1 block of feta roughly chopped or one container of crumbled feta

Handful of cherry tomatoes, halved

½ c pine nuts, toasted

¼ c cilantro, roughly chopped

1-2 finely minced green onions

¼ c olive oil

-Prepare grains as directed on the box, rinsing well and adding 1-2 drops of olive oil to water, which will keep the grains fluffy.  Once fully cooked, fluff with a fork and allow to cool to room temperature as you prep the other ingredients.  Add all and combine well. Chill and serve cold. 

 

Serve these dishes with one of the drinks below:

 

Sparkling Honey-Ginger Lemonade

1 c lemon juice

1/2 c honey

1/2 tsp ground ginger

6 c seltzer water, divided into 1 1/2 c, poured over cups full of ice

- Combine first three ingreients in saucepan, warm steadily until honey and lemon juice easily combine into syrup. Pour 1/4 c of syrup over each cup, stirring to mix. Serves 4, with some syrup leftover.

 

Sangria/Virgin Sangria Spritzer

1 jug of rose (pink wine) (or light fruit juice for virgin drinks)

1 liter of plain seltzer

1 orange, sliced into rounds

1 lemon, sliced into rounds

1 lime, sliced into rounds

1 c raspberries, fresh or frozen

1/4 c agave nectar

-Combine all ingredients in large pitcher, place in refrigerator to chill. Serve with ice. Makes a little more than a gallon.

 Looking for a quick, easy way to increase your water intake this summer. Try adding lemons, limes, mint, or even cucumbers. They add flavor to "boring" water.. Also, if you are prepping carrots and celery sticks for easy lunch prep, store them in water in the refrigerator to keep them crisp. Drain off some of the water to drink. It will be quite refreshing!

Challah back girl!

August 25, 2013

Here is a nice, nourishing recipe for a nice family Sunday brunch, using local ingredients. I love locally-made Essential Baking Company breads

Essential Baking Company Challah- sliced to 1 1/2 inch thickness

2-4 local cage-free eggs

1-2 tbsp of organic cows milk or almond milk

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1/4-1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice

1 stick of butter

Combine eggs and milk (1/2 tbsp milk to each egg). Whisk until fully combined. Add spices. Pour into flat dish or plate.

In frying pan, melt 1 tbsp of butter for each slice of bread.

Dip slices of challah in egg mixture (both sides). 

Add bread to frying pan, allow to saute in butter until toasted, then flip and toast on the other side.

Serve with syrup (I love a gift that I got- Brandy Infused Vanilla-Hickory Syrup) or jam (homemade blueberry jam is my current go-to for my jam needs). 

Food Revolution Day 2013

May 9, 2013

You all should know by now how much I love Jamie Oliver and his Food Revolution, promoting healthy foods in schools and communities. May 17th is the date for his Second Annual Food Revolution Day, a worldwide grassroots effort to provide fun and education experiences around food to local communities. I love what he is doing for so many reasons: healthy kids are better learners, healthy families can work together to make changes in their communities, and healthy communities can provide better support for those who need it most. I strongly encourage my readers to attentd or even host a Food Revolution Day activity in their neighborhood, even if it's as simple as hosting a vegetarian potluck or barbecue for their friends and neighbors. Check out a book about food from the library and read it to your children. Reach out to the local food bank and donate or volunteer to provide more healthy food to their customers. Visit your children's school to see what their school lunch program offers. Try a healthy new dish from a cuisine you aren't familiar with. There are TONS of ways we can improve our diets and our family's lifestyle, from meatless Fridays to making sure we "eat a rainbow" every day. We have the tools within our reach to fight the epidemics of obesity, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses that are distinctly related to our lifestyles. This is one thing that we can do something about. Viva La Revolution!

 

Winter Comfort Foods- Lightened Up!

January 21, 2013

This great post on HuffPo shows you ways to lighten up those lovely, tasty, heavy winter comfort foods. 

Some other great ways to make your favorite foods healthier:

1. For breads, like banana bread or pumpkin bread, try adding apple sauce or smashed banana in place of oil.

2. Use this list for sugar substitutes in baking: zylitol, honey, agave nectar, succanat/rapadura, barley malt, brown rice syrup, corn syrup (NOT HFCS), sorghum, blackstrap molasses, stevia. For many of these, you can find conversion charts online as they don't always translate directly to an equal amount of granulated (white) sugar. With liquid sweeteners, you may need to compensate by lowering the amount of liquid or increasing the total amount of solids in a recipe.

3. To thicken soups or sauce, add cooked, pureed califlower, potato, or zucchini

4. Lots of dairy in the fridge from the holidays or parties? Add it to soups for more flavor and to minimize the amount you'll get in each serving. I did that last weekend and came up with Baked Potato Soup, Split Pea & Bacon Soup, and Broccoli Cheese Soup. While butter, bacon, heavy cream and cream cheese don't need to be in your diet on a daily basis, this is a great way to use them up if you already have them and don't want to waste money by throwing them al out. Plus, adding a small amount of fat can increase satiety, making you more full from eating less.

5. Avoid dairy (if you don't have the problem in #4) by using stocks and broths for liquids instead of milk or cream. 

6: For richness in vegetarian dishes without adding meat, use 1 tsp of miso paste instead. It contains glutamate, which triggers the "umami" tastebuds that tell us when something tastes rich or full (which usually requires meat or butter).

Winning by losing

May 7, 2012

A new article on Newsweek's website: Why The Campaign to Stop America's Obesity Crisis is Failing talks about the same things that our friends over at The Metabolic Effect have been talking about for years! Namely, all calories are not created equal. Calories affect insulin levels differently. Insulin unlocks the door to fat cells, allowing them to uptake blood sugar and store it, making themselves (and the humans who have them) larger over time. 

This is why the basic principles of the Metabolic Effect diet (eating whole foods that do not significantly spike your blood sugar, and therefore your insulin) are sound principles to live by. Eating lean proteins and complex carbohydrates from fruits & vegetables are two very good ways to do this. The low glycemic index food, as they're called, are much preferable to the empty calories of refined and processed sugars and carbohydrates.

Another point to make is to look at "real" foods versus low-calorie or low-fat foods. Our bodies know how to process the proteins, fats and sugars found in whipped cream, for example, including our satiety sensors, which tell us when we're full. But what does our body do with the list of water, hydrogenated vegetable oil, high fructose corn syrup, sodium caseinate, natural and artificial flavors, modified food starch, xanthan and guar gums, polysorbate 60, sodium monostearate, sodium polyphosphates, and beta-carotene. Many of these are naturally-derived ingredients, like guar gum and beta-carotene, but what the heck is a polysorbate 60? And how does it affect insulin and our fat cells.

My first rule of food is: If I can't picture it growing, I don't want to eat it. Now, I know there are no marshmallow bushes, but I've made marshmallows myself and, as long as the ingredient list only has ingredients I used at home, I'm fine eating it. No, I ENJOY it. 

Healthy Fall Recipes

October 14, 2011

As the days get cooler, many people are becoming less active or are worried about putting on weight with holiday food. Tailgating for football games can be damaging to your waistline, too. It all begins with what you put in your mouths, what your options are, and what you provide for your family. Here are some healthy recipe links that run from less processed, homemade sweets for Halloween to healthy and delicious Sunday dinners that are seasonal and easy to prepare.

Halloween:

Burnt Sugar Lollipops

Chocolate Bark with Pistachios and Dried Cherries

Apple "Bites"

Melon Brain

*recipes from www.FamilyFun.Go.Com and www.EatingWell.com

 

Tailgating Recipes:

Guacamole with Chipotle Tortilla Chips

Spicy Black Bean Hummus

Cajun Oven-Fried Chicken

Roasted Potato Salad with Mustard Dressing

Homemade Chunky Chicken Chili

 

*recipes from www.MyRecipes.com and www.recipes.kaboose.com

 

Sunday Dinner:

White Bean Soup with Kale and Chorizo

Roast Chicken with Wild Rice Stuffing

Poached Pears in Merlot with Figs and Hazelnuts

 

Poached Pears in Merlot

4 large pears

1/2 c. hazelnuts, chopped

1/2 c. dried figs, chopped

2 c. Merlot

1 glass baking dish

 

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Core pears, leaving skin on and removing core & seeds. Combine nuts and figs and stuff pears, standing them upright in glass dish. Pour Merlot over tops of pears, cover with foil. Cook at 350 for 30-40 minutes or until pears are cooked and easily pierced with fork. Serves 4 (try adding non-fat vanilla yogurt on top for a decadent twist).

 

*recipes from www.CookingLight.com and Stone Turtle Health

 

 

 

Take a Time Out!

October 13, 2011

Lions, and Tigers and Bears, oh my! It's time for touchdowns, tackles, and tight ends. Whether you're watching your kids play, watching the pros, or playing the weekend warrior playing a pickup game on the front lawn or in the park, fall means football (and soccer) for a lot of people here in Seattle and across the US. Here are a few ways to add some healthy habits to your season!

Stretch! Get all those muscles nice and warm. Stretch your large muscle groups (upper legs- front AND back, calves, biceps & triceps, back muscles and neck muscles) to improve circulation and prevent injuries. Sitting on the couch through a Sunday's-worth of games can take a toll. Get up and move around, grab another glass of water, and keep moving. If you or your kids are on the field, warming up before the game is a MUST to avoid Monday remorse. 

Snack! Healthy snacks, like carrot sticks, orange slices, and peanut butter with crackers are perennial favorites for teams. At home? Add a twist to plain old chips and salsa by making a mix of shredded cabbage, diced tomatoes, onions, garlic and jalapenos to serve alongside. Buy the baked chips this time. Fruit plates, veggie trays with healthy dips like hummus, and chicken skewers instead of ribs and burgers are all great options that are lower in fat and calories. Chili is great, but skip the sour cream and mountains of shredded cheese & bacon bits.*

Drink! Water, that is. The more well-hydrated you are, the less sore you're going to be. Water helps remove waste products from active muscles, making for a more pleasant morning after the big game. Make sure to replace your electrolytes, such as sodium and potassium, which are lost when you sweat and can't be replaced by plain water. Healthy options, such as Recharge or Emergen-C are good alternatives to Gatorade and other electrolyte replacement drinks that use artificial ingredients.

Let's be realistic. Lots of folks like a beer while they watch the game. If you're going to drink alcohol, make sure you have a designated driver. Alternate each alcoholic drink with a large glass of water to avoid over-consumption (by filling up with water, you'll be less inclined to drink more alcohol to satisfy your thirst mechanism, and a stomach full of water will also help to stop you from eating the whole bag of chips by yourself). Know your limits. No one likes to deal with drunks at public sporting events or bars, so be aware of how much you're drinking. 

Have fun! Parents, remember that your kids are playing sports to have fun! Overcompetitive parents and those who argue with the referees, coaches, or other attendees are no fun for anyone. If you're playing, go with a laid-back approach. You're there to have fun, get some exercise, and spend time with your friends and teammates. Enjoy!

Remember Stone Turtle Health for school sports physicals (only $40 or insurance), therapeutic massage for sports injuries, and prevention.

*(Check back tomorrow for fall recipes that are great for entertaining during or after the game.)

 

Jamie Oliver is my hero

June 7, 2011

"Let thy food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food. " This quote from Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine is one of my favorites. The Hippocratic Oath, "First Do No Harm" is commonly used in medical and naturopathic oaths taken by doctors and is the first tenet of naturopathic medicine. Personally, I just love food so much- the tast, the texture, the smell, the sight and sound of cooking and eating freshly prepared meals, the joy of sharing food, drink, and laughter with those closest to me- that it's a natural part of treatment plans that my patients and I create together.

That's why this blog post is a plug for Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution. Whether you watch the show on ABC or go to the Jamie Oliver Foundation website to see what the Food Revolution is all about: check it out one way or another. See, Jamie's a chef from the UK who decided he was disgusted by what local kids were getting in their school lunches. He launched a program that changed the way school lunches were made in the UK and now he's come across the pond to help US schoolchildren and their families get educated about what goes into their bodies, how they can make healthier choices, and how they can make changes happen locally and nationally surrounding the food that we grow, process, distribute, and ultimately buy and feed to our families. The TV show is incredibly touching and enlightening in many ways as it shows kids the difference between real vegetables and what they're being served, empowers families to start cooking for themselves, and addresses institutional problems inherent in the school lunch and fast-food systems.

When I was in school, I worked on a project with a grandiose vision: in-school public health clinics (naturopathic, of course) that provided health care, vaccinations, exercise and weight-loss programs, nutrition education, school gardens, worked with the cafeterias on improving school lunch options, and served as hubs for family and community health. Although we would have been the only clinical provider in the city, we met roadblock after roadblock- parents concerned that their children might receive healthcare without their knowledge, shrinking budgets and fewer opportunities (plus stiffer competition) for grants, and other issues. Eventually, the project went on hiatus, but not before our collaborators, who were simultaneously working on a similar project elsewhere offered me a job as the lead physician. Three weeks after graduation, that project folded due to lack of funds. Maybe we were reaching too far, too fast, but a large part of my dream of becoming a naturopathic physician was to work with kids to introduce healthy lifestyle options and prevent many of the chronic illnesses that are epidemic in American culture, like obesity, heart disease, high cholesterol, diabetes, and ADHD. To teach them the joy of healthy, fresh food.

If the thought of what we put in our kids' bodies concerns you at all, if you worry that your child doesn't know what vegetables look like, if you just want to know how, what, or IF anything can be done to stop this downward spiral into poor health at a younger and younger age, please do yourself 2 favors: 1) Don't buy it if you don't know what's in it (tetrasodium phosphate? YUMMY!), and 2) Check out what other people (including some in your community) are doing to make a difference at Jamie Oliver's website. Many hands make light work.